News

1st edition of the "Symposium des leaders de la...

March 15, 2016

RRISIQ is proud to collaborate in the 1st edition of the "Symposium des leaders de la santé 2016 de l'OIIQ" which will be held on May 4th and 5th 2016.For more infomation, please visit the event's website.

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2016 Prix Florence- 3 RRISIQ laureates

March 7, 2016

We are happy to announce that the following RRISIQ members will be receiving a Prix Florence in the following categories at the Soirée Florence 2016 to be held on May 4th. Nursing Research: José Côté (Université de Montréeal) and Nicole Dubuc (Université de Sherbrooke) Illness Prevention:...

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KT Platform Launch

February 16, 2016

We are happy to announce the launch of RRISIQ's knowledge transfer (KT) platform.This week's highlight is the presentation of a research project for which results have been shaped and disseminated in an original way with the idea to do research with and for people.The overall objective of the...

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Events

2016 RRISIQ Annual Scientific Day

May 13, 2016 09:00 - 17:30 | RRISIQ event

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"Patient Engagement in Research".All our members (regular researchers, associate members, students, clinicians,decision makers and members of the Board,etc.) are invited to join us. REGISTER NOW!   (Deadline is May 1st 2016).You will find the program for the day below.We hope to see you all there!

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Videos

Conference Dr Summit Majumdar ( Part 3)

Conference Dr Summit Majumdar ( Part 3)

March 13, 2015|Videos RRISIQ events
Part 3- Conference « RCTs and Knowledge Translation (KT): Why Do We Let the Perfect Be the Enemy of the Good? »

Friday March 13th 2015

RCTs are the gold standard of perfect evidence, but are too often considered by journals, peer reviewers, and research funders as the only way to evaluate KT interventions; on the other hand many researchers end up conducting uncontrolled before-after studies of limited validity for a variety of pragmatic and other reasons. Using examples from his KT research program Dr Majumdar shows a number of potential study designs that are not “perfect” but are good enough to lead to peer-reviewed funding, publication in major journals, and changes in clinical practice.